Browns Green

B20 - Grid reference SP048914

Brownes Green: first record 1538

Browns Green Lodge © Copyright David Stowell and licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic. Geograph OS reference SP0491. See Acknowledgements for a link to the Geograph website.
Browns Green Lodge © Copyright David Stowell and licensed for reuse under Creative Commons Licence Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic. Geograph OS reference SP0491. See Acknowledgements for a link to the Geograph website.

 

Brownes Green was so-called as early as 1538 when Roger Browne was the tenant. He was paying 4s. 10d for renting a field here. The location is at the junction of Hamstead Hill and Englestede Close.

 

The term 'green' usually denotes an area of common grazing land and is probably medieval. This name is often marked on modern maps but is not in current use, the area being considered part of Handsworth Wood.

 

Take a look at Browns Green Lodge.

On Handsworth Wood Road stands an unusual Grade II Listed building, Browns Green Lodge is a cottage ornée with an overhanging roof supported on tree trunks with ogee-arched branches, ogee-headed door and windows with Y-tracery. An unusual example in Birmingham of the style, this was the lodge of the 18th-century Browns Green House which was demolished sometime before 1900.

 

Browns Green House. Acknowledgements to Handsworth Historical Society for their kind permission to use this image - ‘All Rights Reserved’. See Acknowledgements for a direct link to their website.
Browns Green House. Acknowledgements to Handsworth Historical Society for their kind permission to use this image - ‘All Rights Reserved’. See Acknowledgements for a direct link to their website.

 

William Dargue 12.10.08/ 31.07.2010

 

 

 

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For 19th-century Ordnance Survey maps of Birmingham go to British History Online.

See http://www.british-history.ac.uk/mapsheet.aspx?compid=55192&sheetid=10066&zm=2&x=335&y=273&ox=2577&oy=2100

 

Map below reproduced from Andrew Rowbottom’s website of Old Ordnance Survey maps Popular Edition, Birmingham 1921.

Click the map to link to that website.