Chester Road

B73 - Grid reference SP115932

Ivatt 2-6-2T 41370 at Chester Road Station, Four Oaks-to-New Street 25 February 1956, the last day of steam operation. Photograph courtesy of Robert Darlaston 'All Rights Reserved' See Acknowledgements.
Ivatt 2-6-2T 41370 at Chester Road Station, Four Oaks-to-New Street 25 February 1956, the last day of steam operation. Photograph courtesy of Robert Darlaston 'All Rights Reserved' See Acknowledgements.

 

 

 

The area around Chester Road Station is shown on Ordnance Survey maps as Chester Road and very likely takes its name from that station which opened on the Sutton Coldfield Branch line from Birmingham New Street in 1862.

 

The existence of the station encouraged housing development in the area, and by 1889 the Ordnance Survey map shows a patchwork of building among in this agricultural area. Many of the houses were large semi-detached houses and some very large detached houses. Housing was spreading from Green Lanes and at Wylde Green, which had its own station.

 

Looking south-east along the Chester Road at Chester Road Station. Image from Geograph OS reference SP1193 © Copyright David Stowell reusable under Creative Commons Licence Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic. See Acknowledgements.
Looking south-east along the Chester Road at Chester Road Station. Image from Geograph OS reference SP1193 © Copyright David Stowell reusable under Creative Commons Licence Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic. See Acknowledgements.

 

 

The Chester Road was an prehistoric long-distance route which runs locally through Castle Bromwich via the north of Erdington to Brownhills and was marked on 17th-century maps as the Ridgeway. Although not a Roman road, it was certainly used by the Romans.

 

In 1759 it became part of the Broughton-Chester-Stonebridge Turnpike, an important route which by-passed Birmingham and which linked London, via Coventry and Stonebridge, to the port of Chester. The route is roughly the line of the present A452, joining Watling Street, the present A5, at Brownhills West. In the 18th century the turnpike road near Sutton Park was notorious for highway robberies.  

 

William Dargue  27.10.08/ 01.11.08

 

 

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For 19th-century Ordnance Survey maps of Birmingham go to British History Online.

See http://www.british-history.ac.uk/mapsheet.aspx?compid=55141&sheetid=8815&ox=650&oy=2702&zm=2&czm=2&x=56&y=215

 

Map below reproduced from Andrew Rowbottom’s website of Old Ordnance Survey maps Popular Edition, Birmingham 1921.

Click the map to link to that website.